Am I a Leader or a Manager?

A leader introduces vision, change, new ideas, motivation to act, and others choose to follow them. They open and expand the system they are within and increases the flow of energy and life. Leadership requires spontaneity and creativity and is oriented towards love, the fuel for authentic power.

A manager provides containment, tidiness, ensuring the establishment of and conformance to cultural and organisational conserves through process and policy, with efficiencies arising from oft repeated and improved activities. These have the effect of closing the system, regulating the flow of energy and at best, maintaining the status quo and is oriented toward fear. Sometimes the manager may utilise shame, criticism and micromanage your every thought and action. There is never a good reason for that excessive and inappropriate control, and those behaviours are thoroughly fear-based.

In business, both have their place. It is important to know which is needed in a given situation and to not confuse the two. For example, a major cost cutting, people culling process is largely a management action, though successfully bringing the organisation through and out of such an endeavour requires sound leadership.

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948)
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948)

The orientation toward love or fear can also be used to assess whether the outcomes achieved were the result of leadership or management, or something else. For example, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) inspired a nation and expanded the system the Indian nation was under, ultimately bringing freedom through “nonviolence” from British rule. Mother Teresa (26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997) created change in the world one person at a time.

Adolf Hitler is an interesting one. Was he a leader or something else? Certainly he had an amazing capacity to motivate and move the populous and create change. He had a great ability to put actions into motion and marshal people to create the outcomes he sought. Was it leadership or the actions of a strategic manager. Certainly much of his personal motivation and style involved fear, and he built his Third Reich on the people afraid of an alternative.

Similar principles apply to how you work with yourself. Your internal manager tends to work from a place of fear and directedness, and as a result you may find yourself anxious and experiencing contraction, holding on to what is familiar. Your leader within works from a place of love and trust, is open and spontaneous, and you are then able to remain available to opportunities and retain the capacity to create something positive and new. The manager works more in a reactive fashion; the leader with a greater vision of your long-term future. Both do have their place. Have you learned how to balance the two?